An open letter to Justice K.G. Balakrishnan

An open letter to Justice K.G. Balakrishnan

24 March 2010

To,

Justice Sri. K.G. Balakrishnan

Chief Justice of India

Sir,

On 7 March 2010, when India was eagerly waiting for the Women’s Reservation Bill to be passed and harping on political empowerment of women, you made a “radical suggestion” at a National Seminar on access to justice, relief and rehabilitation of rape victims in New Delhi.

You are reported to have said that courts must give “due regard to the personal autonomy of a rape victim” and “respect her wishes if she chooses to marry the rapist or have the child conceived through the crime”.

You are also reported to have said that “the Union and state governments should create the fund for compensation to be awarded to (rape) victims”, along the lines of a legislation which was enacted in 2005 under which compensation could go up to a maximum of Rs 3 lakh.

The Indian rape law seems to have been based on the radical feminist belief that “all heterosexual intercourse is rape because women, as a group, are not strong enough to give meaningful consent”.

However, your statement suggests that a woman is able to make meaningful decisions on marrying a person who has raped her, which is indeed very radical, and makes you the only Judge who openly pronounced that marriage is the appropriate sentence for the “rapist”.

Your suggestion on compensation to rape victims is also very radical and would certainly be a very lucrative, Government sponsored scheme for men and women who are bankrupt…of all scruples:

  • A man can rape a woman so that he can get married to her.
  • A man can rape a woman and pay her.
  • A woman can have consensual sex and blackmail a man into marriage claiming rape.
  • A woman can make false allegations of rape to get compensation.

Sir, you and the furniture around you are fortunate that even radical feminists like Ms. Brinda Karat and Ms. Girija Vyas merely “took exception” to your radical comments.

It would have been good if you had gone all the way and addressed a “very serious problem” of recent times – “marital rape”. If radical feminist reports are anything to go by, 3 out of 4 women are victims of marital rape. What is the appropriate “sentence” for the man who is already married and has borne children with his “rape victim”? How will the “Government rape relief fund” compensate the married “rape victim”?

I am sure you have the answers and I look forward to your next radical pronouncement.

Regards,

Uma Challa

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The ‘other woman’ in man’s life – his monster-in-law!

Disclaimer:

The following post was inspired by a recent story by feminist author Anubha Sawhney Joshi of the Times of India.  See original article here (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life/relationships/man-woman/The-other-woman-in-mans-life–his-mom/articleshow/5705786.cms)!

The ‘other woman’ in man’s life – his monster-in-law!

Freud and Oedipus are both dead and gone. But grown daughters unwilling to let go of their mother’s pallu are the death of any happy marriage…

It’s a relationship that has spawned scores of criminal cases U/s 498A of IPC , made even stars like Prashant and Adnan Sami look like criminals (depending at which stage you started following the news about them) and taken an age-old tussle and put it out there on the street. It’s the maa-beti saga, where two women (on purpose and off it) are working to finish off an absolutely unsuspecting “bakra” – the son-in-law.

And while nobody’s taking away any credit from the ‘maa’ who bore and raised this fine specimen of femininity that some man has consigned his life to, let’s get some perspective here. Girls, it’s all very well to be your mother’s biggest fan, and love and respect and cherish her. But when you get your own man to have and to hold, it’s time to grow up and be a woman.

“My wife is a hotshot architect who has managed to bag quite a few prestigious projects,” says Bakshi, 29, an industrial designer. “But as soon as her mother enters the scene, she becomes this whimpering, brain-dead little child who cannot function without her approval. It’s so irritating.” Bakshi’s wife Rohini is the prototype for the Indian female, give or take a few exceptions. “Bakshi must understand that my mother, at her age, will not change her thoughts or actions. So he (Bakshi) must,” she says. But what about Rohini herself changing? “What’s wrong with me,” she irritatedly asks. “For one, her mother continues to buy her underwear, and now insists on buying mine too” Bakshi offers. Rohini glares at him and squirms. The example above is not a figment of our imagination. Both Rohini and Bakshi (names obviously changed) are real people and so is their strange situation.

Psychiatrist Sanjana Bagh deals with the ‘mama’s girl’ syndrome on a regular basis and it never ceases to amuse her. “It’s the same story that is told with such amazing regularity – that the girl will bend over backwards to do what her mother wants and her husband will grow to resent that,” says Bagh. “This statement is usually followed by the revelation that the m-i-l is constantly trying to manipulate the daughter and she’s the only one who is neither able nor willing to see that.”

When the Yuvraj of the Indian cricket team proudly announced on national television that he was a mama’s boy, he successfully alienated more than just a few PYTs.  But why don’t Aishwaryas and Eshas of Bollywood have the same effect? In today’s age of economically independent, free-thinking women, no man is willing to ‘cohabit’ with his mother-in-law as the other woman. “Mothers really need to cut the virtual umbilical cord,” says Khushi Sharan, a college student. “Why are they so hell-bent on hanging on to their daughters? Don’t they have a partner of their own? And if not, don’t they just have friends? And a life?” she asks.

Advocate Mrinal Deshmukh, a divorce lawyer, believes that a mother’s interference and domination can – and does – lead to cracks in the marital relationship. “These can be overcome if there is a conscious balancing of relationships done by the female,” says Deshmukh, adding that extreme cases do end up in divorce.

Dev Challa was married to a mama’s girl. “I say ‘was’ not because she changed her ways but because the marriage ended. And I hold her bizarre relationship with her mother solely responsible,” says Dev. “Gauri didn’t have a father and was brought up by her mom. I should have realised there was something very wrong when she suggested we take her along on the honeymoon, just so she wouldn’t feel left out. But at that time, I thought the poor lady needed a holiday so there’s no harm taking her along.” When Dev and Gauri moved to Singapore, of course, Mummy moved with them. From then on, life was hell. “She would insist on cooking and cleaning for me, looking after me, tending to my every need. I felt like she was married to me and my wife was the outsider. And Gauri refused to see my point. ” Being the responsible man he is, Dev believed in an equal distribution of housework. “Juxtapose that with her mother, who would lovingly fulfill all of Gauri’s wishes and make sure our problems were never ironed out, and I looked like an incompetent fool in comparison. Most of our fights began with her coercing me to treat her mother’s intervention favourably,” he says.

Bagh is not surprised how that marriage turned out and has some advice for Gauri and others of her ilk. “Girls have to realise that after marriage, roles shift. And even if you have the same commitment (to your mother), your involvement in discharging those commitments might change. That is in no way a reflection of the love you have for your mother,” she says.

Sham Ronawalla, consultant psychiatrist at Jaslok Hospital offers a simple solution – space. “Even the best of relationships need it and mothers must realise this and be ready to let go of their daughters at a certain stage. In extreme cases, I have seen a mother manipulate a marriage by using dependence and control as synonyms for love. That’s just the worst thing a mother can do to her daughter, especially since she is not going to be around forever to look after her,” says Ronawalla. The good doctor advocates an ideal system where mothers choose to live away from their married children and take up an independent existence of their own. “A mother has to let her daughter develop a healthy relationship with her spouse. If not, sooner or later, the daughter will catch on to the fact that her mother is trying to interfere in her marriage and her reaction will be one of anger and resentment towards her.”

For girls, Ronawalla has one piece of advice: “Stop your mother constantly imposing herself in your married life, or you’ll no longer remain someone’s wife.” Touche.

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Disclaimer:

The following post was inspired by a recent story by feminist author Anubha Sawhney Joshi of the Times of India. This post is meant to provide a balanced perspective on the problems arising in marriages today and not to be taken as an original literary contribution.

See original article here (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life/relationships/man-woman/The-other-woman-in-mans-life–his-mom/articleshow/5705786.cms)!

The ‘other woman’ in man’s life – his monster-in-law!

Freud and Oedipus are both dead and gone. But grown daughters unwilling to let go of their mother’s pallu are the death of any happy marriage…

It’s a relationship that has spawned scores of criminal cases U/s 498A of IPC , made even stars like Prashant and Adnan Sami look like criminals (depending at which stage you started following the news about them) and taken an age-old tussle and put it out there on the street. It’s the maa-beti saga, where two women (on purpose and off it) are working to finish off an absolutely unsuspecting “bakra” – the son-in-law.

And while nobody’s taking away any credit from the ‘maa’ who bore and raised this fine specimen of femininity that some man has consigned his life to, let’s get some perspective here. Girls, it’s all very well to be your mother’s biggest fan, and love and respect and cherish her. But when you get your own man to have and to hold, it’s time to grow up and be a woman.

“My wife is a hotshot architect who has managed to bag quite a few prestigious projects,” says Bakshi, 29, an industrial designer. “But as soon as her mother enters the scene, she becomes this whimpering, brain-dead little child who cannot function without her approval. It’s so irritating.” Bakshi’s wife Rohini is the prototype for the Indian female, give or take a few exceptions. “Bakshi must understand that my mother, at her age, will not change her thoughts or actions. So he (Bakshi) must,” she says. But what about Rohini herself changing? “What’s wrong with me,” she irritatedly asks. “For one, her mother continues to buy her underwear, and now insists on buying mine too” Bakshi offers. Rohini glares at him and squirms. The example above is not a figment of our imagination. Both Rohini and Bakshi (names obviously changed) are real people and so is their strange situation.

Psychiatrist Sanjana Bagh deals with the ‘mama’s girl’ syndrome on a regular basis and it never ceases to amuse her. “It’s the same story that is told with such amazing regularity – that the girl will bend over backwards to do what her mother wants and her husband will grow to resent that,” says Bagh. “This statement is usually followed by the revelation that the m-i-l is constantly trying to manipulate the daughter and she’s the only one who is neither able nor willing to see that.”

When the Yuvraj of the Indian cricket team proudly announced on national television that he was a mama’s boy, he successfully alienated more than just a few PYTs.  But why don’t Aishwaryas and Eshas of Bollywood have the same effect? In today’s age of economically independent, free-thinking women, no man is willing to ‘cohabit’ with his mother-in-law as the other woman. “Mothers really need to cut the virtual umbilical cord,” says Khushi Sharan, a college student. “Why are they so hell-bent on hanging on to their daughters? Don’t they have a partner of their own? And if not, don’t they just have friends? And a life?” she asks.

Advocate Mrinal Deshmukh, a divorce lawyer, believes that a mother’s interference and domination can – and does – lead to cracks in the marital relationship. “These can be overcome if there is a conscious balancing of relationships done by the female,” says Deshmukh, adding that extreme cases do end up in divorce.

Dev Challa was married to a mama’s girl. “I say ‘was’ not because she changed her ways but because the marriage ended. And I hold his bizarre relationship with her mother solely responsible,” says Dev. “Gauri didn’t have a father and was brought up by her mom. I should have realised there was something very wrong when she suggested we take her along on the honeymoon, just so she wouldn’t feel left out. But at that time, I thought the poor lady needed a holiday so there’s no harm taking her along.” When Dev and Gauri moved to Singapore, of course, Mummy moved with them. From then on, life was hell. “She would insist on cooking and cleaning for me, looking after me, tending to my every need. I felt like she was married to me and my wife was the outsider. And Gauri refused to see my point. ” Being the responsible man he is, Dev believed in an equal distribution of housework. ” Juxtapose that with her mother, who would lovingly cook Gauri’s favourite dishes and make sure our clothes were ironed and I looked like an incompetent fool in the family. Most of our fights began with her coercing me to treat her mother’s intervention favourably,” he says.

Bagh is not surprised how that marriage turned out and has some advice for Gauri and others of her ilk. “Girls have to realise that after marriage, roles shift. And even if you have the same commitment (to your mother), your involvement in discharging those commitments might change. That is in no way a reflection of the love you have for your mother,” he says.

Sham Ronawalla, consultant psychiatrist at Jaslok Hospital offers a simple solution – space. “Even the best of relationships need it and mothers must realise this and be ready to let go of their daughters at a certain stage. In extreme cases, I have seen a mother manipulate a marriage by using dependence and control as synonyms for love. That’s just the worst thing a mother can do to her daughter, especially since she is not going to be around forever to look after her,” says Ronawalla. The good doctor advocates an ideal system where mothers choose to live away from their married children and take up an independent existence of their own. “A mother has to let her daughter develop a healthy relationship with her spouse. If not, sooner or later, the daughter will catch on to the fact that her mother is trying to interfere in her marriage and her reaction will be one of anger and resentment towards her.”

For girls, Ronawalla has one piece of advice: “Stop your mother constantly imposing herself in your married life, or you’ll be no longer remain someone’s wife.” Touche.

International Women’s Day Placards

Below are the placards we used for International Women’s Day 2010:

IWD placards

Please feel free to download and print.

And below is the link to the pictures of our celebrations:

http://iwd2010.blogspot.com

Join our Women’s Day Celebrations!

International Women's Day 2010Dear friends,

Join us as we celebrate International Women’s Day on Sunday, 7 March, at 10:30 a.m. in Public Gardens, Nampally (in front of Health Museum), Hyderabad.

On the occasion of International Women’s Day 2010, All India Forgotten Women’s Association (AIFWA), True Equity Network (TEN) India and Andhra Pradesh Mothers-in-law Protection Association (APMPA) are celebrating the many achievements and successes of women. We also address the dilemmas of present day women, and look at the way forward to achieve true empowerment of women.

On the occasion of International Women’s Day, we would like to call upon women to free themselves from self-pity and negativity. We would like all women to remember that:

  • real women have self-esteem and dignity
  • real women reject preferential treatment over men and children
  • real women succeed by proving their true worth
  • real women take responsibility for their actions
  • real women do not make false allegations or file false cases

We call upon the citizens and Government of India to recognize that:

  1. Promoting women’s welfare does not mean weakening and destroying marriage.
  2. Liberating women does not mean destroying their biological and social privileges of being a wife and a mother.
  3. Protecting women does not mean supporting misuse of the law, violating human rights and destroying families.
  4. Empowering women does not mean encouraging blackmail, extortion and parasitism by women.
  5. Encouraging women in all walks of life does not mean providing special privileges and lowered standards of performance.

Join our movement for true empowerment and help end the gender war!

Please come with your near and dear ones and make this event a success!

International Women’s Day – 2010

On the occasion of International Women’s Day 2010, All India Forgotten Women’s Association (AIFWA), True Equity Network (TEN) India and Andhra Pradesh Mothers-in-law Protection Association (APMPA) are celebrating the many achievements and successes of women. At the same time, we address the dilemmas of present day women, and look at the way forward to achieve true empowerment of women.

It is an undeniable fact that women today enjoy a lot of opportunities and independence compared to women of previous generations.  Women are constantly being reminded of their rights and privileges. The Government is constantly doling out policies claiming to empower women and to encourage women’s participation in all walks of life.

We have more women attending schools and colleges, more women graduating with degrees and diplomas, and more women entering varied professions and earning their livelihood. Women are competing with men in academic, corporate, service, bureaucratic, political and other careers. Women now own property and wealth of their own.

Women are realizing their ability to set educational, career, and economic goals for themselves and achieving them. This is definitely worth celebrating and cheering.

Since the last 15-20 years, more and more young women are also putting career first and delaying marriage and children. They are buying into the idea that husband, children and family do not necessarily bring happiness and satisfaction, but on the contrary, obstruct a woman’s freedom. They are convinced that career, individual pursuits and financial freedom promise more of both satisfaction and happiness, as they seemingly do to men. Women’s emancipation has become synonymous with being like men and doing everything they do.

As a result, more women are deliberately or inadvertently relinquishing the choices that their grandmothers and mothers had. More women who want to avoid becoming “slaves of the family” are now becoming slaves of corporate entities and feeling trapped inside offices instead of homes. Women who want to marry, have children, enjoy family life and also have a career are unable to figure out what they need to do to have them all or if it is in fact possible to have them all.

In this age of nuclear families, women are planning their lives with little or no guidance, and with few good role models to look up to. They are struggling to reconcile their natural desire for family and motherhood with the unrealistic standards imposed by radical feminism. The natural pleasures of being a wife, raising children and looking after a home are now turning into a source of agony to many women. Those women who choose to put family first are being portrayed as inferior, and those who walk out on the family at the drop of a hat, labelled liberated women.

As a result, today there are more women separated or never married. Divorce rates are on the rise, and close to 70% of all divorce cases are initiated by women. There are a rising number of women raising their children alone. There are more women with infants and very young children working full-time jobs, and consigning their children to day care centres.

Now there are new justifications for classifying all women as “oppressed” and guilt-tripping or demanding the society to grant them special concessions in every field just for being women. In spite of all the “liberation”, more women are left wondering why happiness is still a mirage, and satisfaction nowhere in sight.

Why did such a situation arise?

Women’s rights activists may claim to champion a woman’s right to be treated as a human (just as a man is), but they forget that we are not just humans but are also women, different from men, with different natural desires and needs which cannot be ignored. Just as we would suffer if we were not treated like humans, we also suffer if we are deprived of the natural gifts and privileges of womanhood.

The feminist movement clearly taught women to demand more rights, privileges and laws. It has taught women to break the shackles of their homes and to step out into the “world of opportunities”. However, it has not taught women how to handle freedom, how to take responsibility for one’s own choices and know when to stop to avoid pitfalls.

Depending on the immediate and extended family for support in case of doubt, difficulty or distress is a thing of the past. Women’s organizations, police stations and courts have become proxy family for the modern woman and dish out an elaborate menu of laws to satisfy her whims more than her needs. By routinely attributing traits of low self-esteem, self pity, vagrancy, vulnerability and helplessness to women and girls, they have turned women into mendicants and parasites.

The women’s movement has also propagated the practice of blaming the men and the so-called “male-dominated” society for all the lapses and failures that result from the irrational ideas and practices advocated by feminism.

On the occasion of International Women’s Day, we would like to call upon women to free themselves from self-pity and negativity. We call upon women to use their education, learning and individuality to make wise choices and take responsibility for the outcomes. We call upon women to stop complaining that they are unable to have the cake and eat it too just because they are women, because the truth is, neither can men.

We call upon the citizens and Government of India to recognize that:

  1. Promoting women’s welfare does not mean weakening and destroying marriage.
  2. Liberating women does not mean destroying their biological and social privileges of being a wife and a mother.
  3. Protecting women does not mean supporting misuse of the law, violating human rights and destroying families.
  4. Empowering women does not mean encouraging blackmail, extortion and parasitism by women.
  5. Encouraging women in all walks of life does not mean providing special privileges and lowered standards of performance.

We must take the following steps to ensure true empowerment and welfare of women:

  1. Non-serious family problems should be corrected through programs offering voluntary assistance to individuals in troubled marriages.
  2. India should be prevented from becoming an anti-marriage, anti-family, fatherless “welfare state”.
  3. Laws and policies must be based on principles of equity and fairness, and not radical feminist ideologies and false statistics.
  4. The feminist culture of mass irresponsibility should be done away with.
  5. Women should be encouraged to inculcate self-esteem, reject preferential treatment, and succeed in their chosen areas of study or career by proving their true worth.

We urge everyone to join our movement for true empowerment and help end the gender war.

Men and Women Against Women’s Reservation Bill

PRESS RELEASE

Sub: Men and Women opposing the 85th Constitutional Amendment Bill (Women’s Reservation Bill)

All India Forgotten Women’s Association (AIFWA) and All India Men’s Welfare Association (AIMWA) are holding this Press Conference to voice their opposition against the 85th Constitutional Amendment Bill (Women’s Reservation Bill).

What does the Women’s Reservation Bill Propose?

  • 33% of all seats in Lok Sabha and State Legislative Assemblies shall be reserved for women.
  • This Reservation shall apply in case of seats reserved for Scheduled Castes (SCs) and Scheduled Tribes (STs) as well (reservation within reservation).
  • The seats to be reserved in rotation will be determined by draw of lots in such a way that a seat shall be reserved only once in three consecutive general elections.

Why is the Women’s Reservation Bill necessary when women already have 50% reservation in local bodies?

  • Advocates of the Bill say that it is essential for ensuring active political participation of women.
  • They claim that increased political participation of women in Parliament and legislatures will help them fight the alleged abuse, discrimination, and inequality prevalent against women.
  • They believe that unless reservation is provided, it would not be possible for more women to join politics in our supposedly “male dominated society”.
  • They tend to see women as a “weaker section of the society” and claim that Affirmative Action should be introduced so that women can be empowered.

Why are AIFWA and AIMWA opposing the Women’s Reservation Bill?

We believe that public representatives in a Democracy should be those who have everyone’s welfare in mind and not promoting a specific gender, caste or creed.

Having said that, the proposed Women’s Reservation Bill is not meant to actually empower women, but it represents the innocuous face of a hidden agenda to make the situation of Indian men miserable. The Women’s Reservation Bill (which has been pending for the last 12 years) is a tool of blackmail used by anti-male women to make more and more biased laws, to fuel a gender war and disrupt harmony in the society.

The Women’s Reservation Bill is not only unjustified in the present circumstances, but it is also in violation of the basic principles of Democracy :

  • Passing the Women’ Reservation Bill is undemocratic because male citizens will be forced to withdraw or prevented from contesting in reserved constituencies solely because they are male. It takes away the democratic right of about 11 crore men to contest in the elections. This is against the fundamental rights of 11 crore men. It violates the right to equality guaranteed under the constitution.
  • Passing the Women’ Reservation Bill is undemocratic because women are not an oppressed class who need their own representatives in the Parliament to address their specific issues. Many laws and provisions have been passed in the last 60 years by the so-called “male-dominated” Parliament.

The following are a few examples of pro-women policies made in the last 60 years due to Article 15(3) of the Constitution (special provisions for women):

  1. Financial Privileges: Women are accorded many financial privileges e.g. through a variety of Self-Help Group Schemes; whereas men have to borrow at a high interest and end up committing suicide when they are unable to repay the loans;
  2. Health Privileges: National level surveys are conducted and funds are allocated for women’s health and wellness; whereas not a single survey is done or health scheme implemented, nor single rupee of tax payer money spent on men’s health and wellness.
  3. Tax Rebate/ Relief: – Earnings by women are subject to liberal Tax Rebates; whereas men, who perform some of the most difficult and hazardous jobs to support the family and the society receive no Tax Rebates on their earnings.
  4. Anti-male laws: Women have been armed with many laws like Indian Penal Code Section 498A, Protection of Women Against Domestic Violence Act, adultery laws, laws against rape and sexual harassment, and family (divorce, maintenance and child custody) laws, all of which specifically favour women and penalize innocent men and their families.

It has to be noted that the Ministry of Women and Child Development, in collaboration with the National Commission for Women, has miserably failed to make policies which truly empower women and enhance their self-esteem. Instead, they have drafted laws which promote misuse of protections and privileges granted to women and encourage parasitism, perjury, adultery, and extortion by women.

  • Passing the Women’ Reservation Bill will cause bias in the democratic process because of the following reasons:

a)    Powerful male members of parties will be tempted to field female relatives to “reserve” the seat for themselves during the following cycle.

b)    Parties will be forced to field women whether or not the women identify with the overall party agenda and the rest of the issues concerning all citizens, as opposed to just women’s issues. There are no provisions to prevent discrimination against men because of fielding women who are inclined towards women’s issues alone, or, in other words, biased against men.

c)    Parties will be forced to field unsuitable female candidates or those of lower calibre just to fill the seats and treat like them puppets, which will defeat the purpose of increasing representation of women in the Parliament.

d) Women capable of earning a position and respect by their own hard work will not be able to become MPs or Chief Ministers.

  • Passing the Women’ Reservation Bill will create a bias in the minds of voters and cause them to start voting or stop voting on the basis of gender and not based on publicized agendas of parties or issues related to all citizens.
  • Passing of the Women’s Reservation Bill will take away the democratic right of 33% of the electorate (22 crore people) to elect their representatives.  It restricts the choice of both men and women in the reserved constituencies. The state has no right to limit the pool of representatives available to the public to choose from. This is against all democratic principles of free choice.

In a Democracy, there should not be any discrimination between women and men in any area, including standing for elections. Citizens should be able to choose between candidates based on their relative calibre and commitment to public issues. Citizens’ rights are violated when their choice is restricted to a specific gender as calibre or commitment is not gender-specific.

Commonsense dictates that if the representation of women in politics is not sufficient, it is the fault of political party heads. Advocates of the Women’s Reservation Bill are insisting on needlessly penalizing citizens of a democratic country, instead of taking action against political parties which are preventing women from or failing to provide opportunities for women to contest in the elections.

AIFWA and AIMWA demand that the Government NOT pass the Women’s Reservation Bill. Instead, the Government must take the following measures in the interest of democracy and for the welfare of ALL citizens:

  1. Require political parties to provide 33% tickets to women to contest in the elections.
  2. Ensure 33% representation by women in the Rajya Sabha , and then increase it to 50% before tampering with the constitution and making reservations to increase women’s representation in the Lok Sabha.
  1. Establish  National Commission for Men for conducting surveys and studies on mens’ issues and for formulating measures, policies and laws for welfare of men;
  2. Establish Mens’ Welfare Ministry with Cabinet rank;
  3. Amend the People’s Representation Act to include “all recognized political parties to reserve 33% for women with a staggered time frame e.g. 33% in year 1 to zero in year 30.”
  4. Amend Article 15(3) by deleting the word “women” ;
  5. Amend Article 51 (E) to include the word “men” ;
  6. Implement Women’s reservation in judiciary, bureaucracy, defence etc.;
  7. Implement Women’s Reservation in Panchayats and Municipality in all the States and Union Territories.

Sincerely,

Uma Challa – Media Coordinator – All India Forgotten Women’s Association, Contact – 9704683163

Swarup Sarkar – Media Coordinator – All India Men’s Welfare Association, Contact – 9818789236